Class of 2018 & Prior

2011-2012-Yr-1-Map

Orientation to the Medical and Dental School (1 week)

A general introduction to the Medical and Dental Schools, including beliefs and values embedded within the curriculum.

Principles of Human Biology (PRIN 401) (14 weeks)

The goals of this part of the curriculum are to study the biology of the normal human from cell, to organ, to a physiological system, to human behaviour, to a member of a complex society; and to introduce basic concepts of disease. This part recognizes the diverse backgrounds of students entering medical school, and attempts to arrive at a degree of common skills and abilities.

Foundations of Medicine (55 weeks)

The goals of this part of the curriculum are set so that the student acquires the basics of medicine upon a foundation that analyzes illness at the level of its biological, behavioural and population components. The guiding philosophy of this part is the integration of normal with abnormal structure and function, and subsequent clinical correlations and options for intervention.

The course is divided into a series of systems blocks:

  • Host Defenses and Infection(5 weeks)
  • Cardiovascular (5 weeks)
  • Pulmonary (5 weeks)
  • Fluids and Electrolytes and Renal GU (5 weeks)

Longitudinal Courses

The following three courses run continuously throughout the first two years of the program.

  • Doctor Patient and Society (DPAS 410)

This multidisciplinary course examines critical issues in health care. Plenary sessions and small group tutorials address themes such as the social determinants of health, health care systems, evidence-based medicine, epidemiology, prevention, ethics and law, multiculturalism and marginalized populations.

  • Clinical Skills (INDE 410)

Year I: Students are introduced to and develop basic skills in communication, components of health history, basic medical instruments and the physical examination.

  • Family Practice Continuum (FMPR 401)

Year I: First year basic medical and behavioural sciences are correlated to the Family Practice setting. Principles and skills of patient interviewing, history-taking and physical examination are practised under supervision in office, home, hospital and community settings. The role of the family physician in comprehensive patient care is examined.

2011-2012-Yr-2-map

Foundation of Medicine Blocks

  • Blood and Lymphatics (2 weeks)
  • Gastrointestinal (4 weeks)
  • Musculoskeletal and Locomotor (4 weeks)
  • Endocrine and Metabolism (5 weeks)
  • Integument (1 week)
  • Brain and Behaviour (9 weeks)
  • Reproduction (4 weeks)
  • Growth and Development (5 weeks)

Longitudinal Courses

The following three courses run continuously throughout the first two years of the program.

  • Doctor Patient and Society (DPAS 420)

This multidisciplinary course examines critical issues in health care. Plenary sessions and small group tutorials address themes such as the social determinants of health, health care systems, evidence-based medicine, epidemiology, prevention, ethics and law, multiculturalism and marginalized populations.

  • Clinical Skills (INDE 420)

Year II: Students further develop general and specific communication skills, while learning to elicit symptoms, additional history and physical examination skills.

  • Family Practice Continuum (FMPR 420)

Year II: The advanced application of medical and behavioural sciences to family practice is examined.

Rural Family Practice Clerkship (4 weeks)

Students are introduced to a clinical practice setting in order to participate in the practical aspects of life and medical practice outside the context of urban tertiary institutional settings.

Clinical Clerkships (49 weeks)

Students act as Clinical Clerks in Anaesthesia, Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Orthopaedics, Ophthalmology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Surgery. There is also a 2-week Elective period. Prior to the start of third year there is an orientation period for ward and clinical skills. During basic clerkships, students perform histories, physical examinations, identification and work-up of patient problems, using the biological-behavioral-population paradigm.

The Purpose of Year 4:

  • to prepare students to achieve exit competencies
  • to graduate an undifferentiated physician
  • to allow the exploration of career choices
  • to nurture readiness for the next steps in a medical career, e.g., MCCQE Part 1, and a residency programme of choice

The Year 4 Curriculum facilitates achieving and realizing these goals.

There are four curriculum elements in Year 4:

1. Clinical Block 1: September to December

2. Clinical Block 2: March to April

3. Preparation for Medical Practice* (PMP) Block: 2 weeks in January and 4 weeks in February and March.

4. Comprehensive OSCE Assessment: A comprehensive objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) based on the MD Undergraduate Program outcome objectives will be administered as an exit examination for the MD Undergraduate Program. All students must pass the OSCE in order to graduate.

* The goal of Preparation for Medical Practice (PMP) is to set students up to effectively prevent disease at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels, as well as provide rehabilitation and palliative care when indicated. The themes include Preventative Medicine, Patient Safety, Evidence-Based Medicine, Informatics, Electronic Health Technologies, Communication, Ethics, Professionalism, and Diagnostics with a focus on laboratory and imaging, Therapeutics with a focus on pharmacological but also exposure to physiotherapy and counselling,and Palliative Care.

The Year 4 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

The comprehensive objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) based on the MD Undergraduate Programme outcome objectives will be administered as an exit examination for fourth year medical students. Achieving a numeric score in the OSCE of less than 60% will result in a failure. All students must pass the OSCE in order to graduate.

The Year 4 OSCE will take place at each students home sites, IMP, NMP & VFMP during a weekend at the end of the fall semester (Exam dates will vary). Each student will participate in 16 stations total: 8 stations on Saturday and 8 stations on Sunday. Students are required to attend both examination dates.

Elective Selection "Rules" for a balanced Year 4 Schedule

  • Students currently select 30 weeks of Electives
  • Students must complete 14 weeks of their Elective Program at a UBC site
  • Students may spend 8 weeks at OOC/Non-LCME Schools during their Elective Program
  • No more than 12 weeks in any one CaRMS entry position